2011 National Performance Measures: Healthy Futures Focus Area

Grants in the Healthy Futures Focus Area will meet health needs within communities including access to care, aging in place, and addressing childhood obesity. Access to care is broadly defined and may include health insurance, culturally appropriate health care interventions, transportation, language translation, access to disease and disability prevention, health promotion initiatives, health literacy and efforts to address health disparities. Grants may support older adults, homebound individuals and disabled individuals with activities such as food delivery, transportation or other services that allow them to live independently, including evidence-based programs supported by other partner agencies such as the U. S. Departments of Health and Human Services and Veterans Affairs. The Corporation seeks to fund programs that target risk factors for childhood obesity, including poor nutrition and physical inactivity, and that reflect the recommendations of the National Prevention Council and the White House Task Force on Childhood Obesity.

Applicants opting in to National Measures must select at least one of the output measures (H1-H8) that matches their program model. Applicants must also develop an aligned self-determined outcome measure.

Select a Measure:

  • H 1: Number of individuals who are uninsured, economically disadvantaged, medically underserved, or living in rural areas utilizing preventive and primary health care services and programs.
  • H 2: Number of clients to whom information on health insurance, health care access and health benefits programs is delivered.
  • H 3: Number of clients enrolled in health insurance, health services, and health benefits programs.
  • H 4: Number of clients participating in health education programs.
  • H 5: Number of children and youth engaged in in-school or afterschool physical education activities with the purpose of reducing childhood obesity.
  • H 6: Number of children and youth receiving nutrition education with the purpose of reducing childhood obesity.
  • H 7: Number of clients receiving language translation services at clinics and in emergency rooms.
  • H 8: Number of homebound OR older adults and individuals with disabilities receiving food, transportation, or other services that allow them to live independently.

Measures:

Measure H 1: Number of individuals who are uninsured, economically disadvantaged, medically underserved, or living in rural areas utilizing preventive and primary health care services and programs.

  • References/Authority:
    • SAA Indicator:(i) Access to health services among economically disadvantaged individuals and individuals who are members of medically underserved populations.
    • SAA Activity: (ii) Assisting individuals in obtaining access to health services, including oral health services, for themselves or their children.
    • SAA Activity: (iii) Educating economically disadvantaged individuals and individuals who are members of medically underserved populations about, and engaging individuals described in this clause in, initiatives regarding navigating the health services system and regarding disease prevention and health promotion, with a particular focus on common health conditions, chronic diseases, and conditions, for which disease prevention and health promotion measures exist and for which socioeconomic, geographic, and racial and ethnic health disparities exist.
  • Definition of Key Terms:
    • Uninsured: An individual lacks insurance coverage. (This definition is consistent with the National Health Information Survey (NHIS).
    • Economically disadvantaged individuals: Meet income eligibility criteria for Medicaid or SCHIP in the state where the individual/family accessing services resides; do not have to meet other eligibility criteria.
    • Medically underserved: An individual who lives in a medically underserved area, as defined by HHS, or is a member of a medically underserved population. The term ‘medically underserved population’ has the meaning given that term in section 330(b)(3) of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 254b(b)(3)). Programs may also provide justification for other medically underserved populations.
    • Healthcare services: Accessible, comprehensive, continuous, and coordinated care to preserve health and prevent, treat or manage disease or infirmity, provided and consistently available in the context of family and community.
    • Preventive health care services: Preventive health behavior is "any activity undertaken by an individual who (believed to be) healthy for the purpose of preventing or detecting illness in an asymptomatic state" (Kasl and Cobb 1966, p.246).
    • Primary health care: The concept of primary health care was defined by the World Health Organization in 1978 as both a level of health service delivery and an approach to health care practice. Primary care, as the provision of essential health care, is the basis of a health care system. This is in contrast to secondary health care, which is consultative, short term, and disease oriented for the purpose of assisting the primary care practitioner.
  • How to Calculate Measure/Collect Data:
    • Count unduplicated new individuals who actually use the preventive and primary health care services and programs, as a result of the grantee’s activities.
    • Grantee records that are follow-up data on clients referred to health care services and programs. Requires grantee to follow-up with client.

(Back to top)

Measure H 2: Number of clients to whom information on health insurance, health care access and health benefits programs is delivered.

  • References/Authority:
    • SAA Indicator: (ii) Access to health services for uninsured individuals, including such individuals who are economically disadvantaged children.
    • SAA Activity: (ii) Assisting individuals in obtaining access to health services, including oral health services, for themselves or their children.
    • SAA Activity: (i) Assisting economically disadvantaged individuals in navigating the health services system.
    • SAA Activity: (iii) Educating economically disadvantaged individuals and individuals who are members of medically underserved populations about, and engaging individuals described in this clause in, initiatives regarding navigating the health services system and regarding disease prevention and health promotion, with a particular focus on common health conditions, chronic diseases, and conditions, for which disease prevention and health promotion measures exist and for which socioeconomic, geographic, and racial and ethnic health disparities exist.
  • Definition of Key Terms:
    • The information may be delivered using methods such as individual-level interactions, group-level interactions, hotlines, clearinghouses, etc.
    • Health insurance: Risk arrangement that assures financial coverage for a defined range of health care services, known as benefits, only if these are required. Coverage is offered to an individual or group in exchange for regular payments (premiums paid regardless of use of benefits) by a licensed third party (not a health care provider) or entity, usually an insurance company or government agency that pays for medical services but does not receive or provide health care services.
    • Preventive health care services: Preventive health behavior is "any activity undertaken by an individual who is (believed to be) healthy for the purpose of preventing or detecting illness in an asymptomatic state" (Kasl and Cobb 1966, p.246). In the context of healthcare services this may include the provision of a range of activities such as immunizations, family planning, and health/wellness education. More broadly this includes individuals engaging in lifestyle changes (e.g., nutrition, exercise) to help mitigate risk of disease.
  • How to Calculate Measure/Collect Data:
    • Count unduplicated new individuals who are provided with information, as a result of the grantee’s activities. If more than one method of delivery is used (e.g., a group-level interaction followed by an individual-level interaction), count the client only once.
    • Grantee reports and logs of interactions with clients.

(Back to top)

Measure H 3: Number of clients enrolled in health insurance, health services, and health benefits programs.

  • References/Authority:
    • SAA Indicator: (i) Access to health services among economically disadvantaged individuals and individuals who are members of medically underserved populations.
    • SAA Indicator: (ii) Access to health services for uninsured individuals, including such individuals who are economically disadvantaged children;
    • SAA Activity: (i) Assisting economically disadvantaged individuals in navigating the health services system;
    • SAA Activity: (ii) Assisting individuals in obtaining access to health services, including oral health services, for themselves or their children;
    • SAA Activity: (iii) Educating economically disadvantaged individuals and individuals who are members of medically underserved populations about, and engaging individuals described in this clause in, initiatives regarding navigating the health services system and regarding disease prevention and health promotion, with a particular focus on common health conditions, chronic diseases, and conditions, for which disease prevention and health promotion measures exist and for which socioeconomic, geographic, and racial and ethnic health disparities exist.
  • Definition of Key Terms:
    • Enrolled would mean newly enrolled, as a result of grantee activities. Clients may or may not have existing health insurance, or previous use of health services and health benefits programs.
    • Health insurance: is risk arrangement that assures financial coverage for a defined range of health care services, known as benefits, only if these are required. Coverage is offered to an individual or group in exchange for regular payments (premiums paid regardless of use of benefits) by a licensed third party (not a health care provider) or entity, usually an insurance company or government agency that pays for medical services but does not receive or provide health care services.
  • How to Calculate Measure/Collect Data:
    • The new unduplicated clients that were ultimately enrolled in a health insurance, health services, or health benefits program. Count each client only once. For example, enrolling a client in health insurance and then enrolling that same client in a health service would count as one client.
    • Grantee records or data (application and follow-up) on client enrollment and health insurance status.

(Back to top)

Measure H 4: Number of clients participating in health education programs.

  • References/Authority:
    • SAA Indicator: (iii) Participation, among economically disadvantaged individuals and individuals who are members of medically underserved populations, in disease prevention and health promotion initiatives, particularly those with a focus on addressing common health conditions, addressing chronic diseases, and decreasing health disparities.
    • SAA Indicator: (iv) Literacy of patients regarding health
    • SAA Activity: (ii) Assisting individuals in obtaining access to health services, including oral health services, for themselves or their children;
    • SAA Activities: (vii) Assisting in health promotion interventions that improve health status, and helping people adopt and maintain healthy lifestyles and habits to improve health status;
    • SAA Activity: (iii) Educating economically disadvantaged individuals and individuals who are members of medically underserved populations about, and engaging individuals described in this clause in, initiatives regarding navigating the health services system and regarding disease prevention and health promotion, with a particular focus on common health conditions, chronic diseases, and conditions, for which disease prevention and health promotion measures exist and for which socioeconomic, geographic, and racial and ethnic health disparities exist.
  • Definition of Key Terms:
    • Health education program: “any planned combination of learning experiences designed to predispose, enable, and reinforce voluntary behavior conducive to health in individuals, groups or communities.” (Green, LW and Kreuter, MW. Health Promotion Planning: An Educational and Ecological Approach, 3rd ed. Mountain View, CA: Mayfield Publishing Company; 1999.) An educational process by which the public health system conveys information to the community regarding community health status, health care needs, positive health behaviors and health care policy issues. (National Public Health Performance Standards Project.)
  • How to Calculate Measure/Collect Data:
    • Count unduplicated new clients who participate in the grantee’s health education program. If the health education program has multiple sessions, topics, etc., count the client once. Do not count clients by number of sessions. For example, if a health education program meets once a month for one year, and has 12 participants who complete, then only report 12 (not 144).
    • Grantee collects data on clients attending each session. Logs, case management systems, etc.

(Back to top)

Measure H 5: Number of children and youth engaged in in-school or afterschool physical education activities with the purpose of reducing childhood obesity.

  • References/Authority:
    • SAA Indicator: (viii) Addressing childhood obesity through in-school and after-school physical activities, and providing nutrition education to students, in elementary schools and secondary schools.
  • Definition of Key Terms:
    • Children and youth must be enrolled in elementary, middle, or high school programs within a public, charter, private, or home-school arrangement. Physical education activities must be in addition to regular activities that would have been provided by the school or afterschool program (cannot supplant existing activities). One goal of the physical activity should be to reduce or prevent childhood obesity.
  • How to Calculate Measure/Collect Data:
    • Count of the number of children actively participating in the activities. Not just the number enrolled or even the number attending, but rather the number who engage in the activities. Count each child only once.

(Back to top)

Measure H 6: Number of children and youth receiving nutrition education with the purpose of reducing childhood obesity.

  • References/Authority:
    • SAA Indicator: (viii) Addressing childhood obesity through in-school and afterschool physical activities, and providing nutrition education to students, in elementary schools and secondary schools.
  • Definition of Key Terms:
    • Children and youth must be enrolled in elementary, middle, or high school programs within a public, charter, private, or home-school arrangement.
    • Nutrition education must be in addition to what they would have regularly received as part of planned school curriculum or afterschool activity (cannot supplant existing activities). The education should be appropriate to the grade level.
  • How to Calculate Measure/Collect Data:
    • Count of the number of children attending the nutrition education sessions. If delivered to a classroom, count the number of children in attendance that day (not the enrollment of children in the classroom). Every effort should be made to count each child only once. If the nutrition education program includes multiple topics or sessions, count each child once.

(Back to top)

Measure H 7: Number of clients receiving language translation services at clinics and in emergency rooms.

  • References/Authority:
    • SAA Activity: (v) Providing translation services at clinics and in emergency rooms to improve health services.
    • SAA Activity: (ii) Assisting individuals in obtaining access to health services, including oral health services, for themselves or their children.
  • Definition of Key Terms:
    • Clinic: Any medical facility or establishment where medical services are provided, and where more than one medical specialty is practiced. This may include public health clinics, hospitals, etc.
    • Emergency rooms: Located in hospitals or care facilities and handle cases that require immediate attention.
    • Translation: Includes both written and verbal, interpretive services to help patients not fluent in English writing and/or speaking better communicate their medical needs and understand their medical instructions.
  • How to Calculate Measure/Collect Data:
    • Count unduplicated new clients who receive the language translation services. If an encounter involves more than one person (e.g., family members), count each individual separately.
    • Grantee collects data on clients who received translation services at clinics or emergency rooms. Logs, case management systems, etc.

(Back to top)

Measure H 8: Number of homebound OR older adults and individuals with disabilities receiving food, transportation, or other services that allow them to live independently.

  • References/Authority:
    • SAA Indicator: (ix) Addressing issues faced by home-bound citizens, such as needs for food deliveries, legal and medical services, nutrition information, and transportation.
  • Definition of Key Terms:
    • Homebound: Individuals unable to leave their personal residence due to disability, injury, or age; may be a short term or long term need; for example, an individual may have a broken hip that prevents them from driving for a few months but after the injury has healed they no longer require help to live independently.
    • Older Adults: Individuals age 65 or older.
    • Person with a Disability: An individual who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities; has a record of such an impairment; or is regarded as having such an impairment, even though no impairment in fact exists.
    • Live independently: Individuals live in a private residence (house, apartment, mobile home, etc.) rather than in an assisted living facility, nursing home, or group home.
    • Receiving food, transportation, or other services: Individual should receive the supports needed to maintain independent living; not all individuals will require the same supports; may include food deliveries, legal and medical services, nutrition information, transportation, etc.
  • How to Calculate Measure/Collect Data:
    • Count number of qualifying individuals as defined above who receive the service. Each individual should be counted only once. If two eligible individuals live at the same address, they should both be counted. If an eligible individual lives with someone else who is not eligible, the non-eligible individuals in the household should not be counted. Each individual should be counted only once during the program year even though most individuals are likely to need on-going support.
    • Project Star information kits created for Senior Corps provide some information about how to track services.

(Back to top)


Enter Keywords to Find Resources:

 

 

Back to Top